acochlidette:

all hail goth moth

acochlidette:

all hail goth moth

henrieke-g:

Little fanart of Kid from Momo's webcomic Bug Pond! The cutest comic ever about BUGS!
I got sidetracked while doing my tax report…

henrieke-g:

Little fanart of Kid from Momo's webcomic Bug Pond! The cutest comic ever about BUGS!

I got sidetracked while doing my tax report…

vesperstardust:

Guys, look what I found today walking on my way home. 8> I held her (?) until she flew back down on the ground at which point I figured she was either sick of me or wanted to get back to hunting (or both).

MAXIMISE for full mantis effect

Made a new friend! Either a Giant House Spider or a Hobo, but I am guessing Giant. They’re more common in this area and you’re more likely to find them indoors than Hobos (and he was found indoors, thankfully before my cats found him).

Made a new friend! Either a Giant House Spider or a Hobo, but I am guessing Giant. They’re more common in this area and you’re more likely to find them indoors than Hobos (and he was found indoors, thankfully before my cats found him).

libutron:

whatthefauna:

The sequined (or mirror) spider has silvery patches covering its abdomen. Because the speckles reflect and scatter light, they may make the spider harder for predators to see. Amazingly, the patches with change in size depending on the spider’s level of agitation.
Image credit: Andrew Ker

Thwaitesia nigronodosa (Theridiidae)

libutron:

whatthefauna:

The sequined (or mirror) spider has silvery patches covering its abdomen. Because the speckles reflect and scatter light, they may make the spider harder for predators to see. Amazingly, the patches with change in size depending on the spider’s level of agitation.

Image credit: Andrew Ker

Thwaitesia nigronodosa (Theridiidae)

hexapodkittens:

littlecoffeemonsters:

the pearl dance

@ painted-bees

Cat Lady Commentary: Oh no, SHE’S SO CUTE ; A;
Cha-cha-chaaa~ 

peaceful-moon:

thank you so much little buddy

peaceful-moon:

thank you so much little buddy

moonstonebeginning:

A great addition to your garden or back yard. - Bee watering station. 
Bees need water just like we do but often times drown in open water. To make a bee watering station you can either do what is shown in the photo above and fill the bowl of a dog/cat watering jug with stones or you can fill a small dish with marbles and add water to that. That way the bees have something to land on!

moonstonebeginning:

A great addition to your garden or back yard. - Bee watering station. 

Bees need water just like we do but often times drown in open water. To make a bee watering station you can either do what is shown in the photo above and fill the bowl of a dog/cat watering jug with stones or you can fill a small dish with marbles and add water to that. That way the bees have something to land on!

dou-hong:

14” Tall (16.5” if you include the antennae!)
6” Wide
8” Deep

Wing Length 16.5”
Wing Span 32” (She is HUGE)
Whew!!! My first Sculpey sculpture! Took about two and a half weeks, made mainly with time outside work  ^^. It took a while to decide who I wanted to sculpt first, but I went with one of my re-designs, R’amey Holl, a Green Lantern. Lots of changes were made as I was sculpting, most noticeably around her lower body area and her wings. I used almost a whole lb of sculpey original, which is probably why she’s lookin’ so rough-ish. ^^
Hope ya’ll like it! Keepin’ the GLTAS love alive! Hopefully I can make some more redesigns/oc’s in the future ^^. Gonna be dropping another design set (babies) during the remainder of this week.

valvala:

ghostigal:

Acacia leaf beetle - Calomela parilis

This colorful beetle is scientifically named Calomela parilis (Coleoptera - Chrysomelidae), an Australian species of green leaf beetle with pitted metallic elytra. This species is most often found on Black Wattle (Acacia mearnsii).

Photo credit: ©Matin L. | Locality: Mt. Lofty, Victoria, Australia (2014)

im reblogging this again bc i want everyone to know this cute lil glitter beetle is ME

kingcheddarxvii:

crookedbeast:

OH…

protect this snail at all costs

currentsinbiology:

Bacteria from bees possible alternative to antibiotics
Raw honey has been used against infections for millennia, before honey — as we now know it — was manufactured and sold in stores. So what is the key to its’ antimicrobial properties? Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have identified a unique group of 13 lactic acid bacteria found in fresh honey, from the honey stomach of bees. The bacteria produce a myriad of active antimicrobial compounds.

These lactic acid bacteria have now been tested on severe human wound pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), among others. When the lactic acid bacteria were applied to the pathogens in the laboratory, it counteracted all of them.

Tobias C Olofsson, Èile Butler, Pawel Markowicz, Christina Lindholm, Lennart Larsson, Alejandra Vásquez. Lactic acid bacterial symbionts in honeybees - an unknown key to honey’s antimicrobial and therapeutic activities. International Wound Journal, 2014; DOI: 10.1111/iwj.12345
Working bees on honey cells (stock image). Raw honey has been used against infections for millennia, before honey — as we now know it — was manufactured and sold in stores. Credit: © Dmytro Smaglov / Fotolia

currentsinbiology:

Bacteria from bees possible alternative to antibiotics

Raw honey has been used against infections for millennia, before honey — as we now know it — was manufactured and sold in stores. So what is the key to its’ antimicrobial properties? Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have identified a unique group of 13 lactic acid bacteria found in fresh honey, from the honey stomach of bees. The bacteria produce a myriad of active antimicrobial compounds.

These lactic acid bacteria have now been tested on severe human wound pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), among others. When the lactic acid bacteria were applied to the pathogens in the laboratory, it counteracted all of them.

Tobias C Olofsson, Èile Butler, Pawel Markowicz, Christina Lindholm, Lennart Larsson, Alejandra Vásquez. Lactic acid bacterial symbionts in honeybees - an unknown key to honey’s antimicrobial and therapeutic activities. International Wound Journal, 2014; DOI: 10.1111/iwj.12345

Working bees on honey cells (stock image). Raw honey has been used against infections for millennia, before honey — as we now know it — was manufactured and sold in stores. Credit: © Dmytro Smaglov / Fotolia
hexapodkittens:

This is absolutely not me, nor my goal—I—it’s just…just a funny comic relevant to my blog. Ha hahahaha hah…

hexapodkittens:

This is absolutely not me, nor my goal—I—it’s just…just a funny comic relevant to my blog. Ha hahahaha hah…

archiemcphee:

It’s never too early to start planning what to offer your neighborhood trick-or-treaters. These remarkably/horrifyingly lifelike gummy grubs and caterpillars would make awesome Halloween treats. Although they may look like they just wriggled out of your nightmares, they’re actually handmade, fruit-filled sweets. They’re made in Japan at Akai Tento no Koohii Ten (The Red Tent Coffee Shop), a small coffee stand located on the east coast of Aomori Prefecture.

We can’t stop staring at these photos, because we’re convinced one of the grubs is about to twitch. Akai Tento is a small business, but these amazingly unsettling creepy-crawly gummy candies have earned the shop nationwide (and now international) attention.

Each of Akai Tento’s gruesome gummies is available to buy individually or in packs (or perhaps that should be clutches?) via Yahoo! Japan Shopping, and cost between 300 and 350 yen (US$2.80-3.20) each.

Photos via Akai Tento and Yahoo! Shopping

[via RocketNews24]